New polls show tight race between Trump and Clinton

By Bonnie K. Goodman

(FILE PHOTO) In this composite image a comparison has been made between former US Presidential Candidates Hillary Clinton (L) and Donald Trump. ***LEFT IMAGE*** PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) ***RIGHT IMAGE*** LAS VEGAS, NV - DECEMBER 15: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during the CNN Republican presidential debate on December 15, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. This is the last GOP debate of the year, with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) gaining in the polls in Iowa and other early voting states and Donald Trump rising in national polls. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
(FILE PHOTO) In this composite image a comparison has been made between former US Presidential Candidates Hillary Clinton (L) and Donald Trump. ***LEFT IMAGE*** PHILADELPHIA, PA – JULY 28: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party’s nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) ***RIGHT IMAGE*** LAS VEGAS, NV – DECEMBER 15: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during the CNN Republican presidential debate on December 15, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. This is the last GOP debate of the year, with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) gaining in the polls in Iowa and other early voting states and Donald Trump rising in national polls. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

New national polls show a conflicted but tight race between Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. A new Rasmussen Reports poll released on Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, has Trump leading Clinton by 5 points. Just the day before, on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016, Clinton led Trump by 6 percent in the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

According to the Rasmussen poll, Trump has 44 percent support to Clinton’s 39 percent. Factoring third party candidates, Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson has 8 percent support, and Green Party nominee Jill Stein only has 2 percent. Trump’s lead is growing in this conservative-leaning poll up from only a two percent lead in last week’s edition.

In another recent national poll conducted by NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, Clinton led Trump 43 to 37 percent. Third party candidates, Johnson had 9 percent, while Stein had 3 percent. The poll skewed towards Clinton in every aspect; it determined that 55 percent of Clinton supporters say they are “positively” voting for her, but 44 percent say they are voting for Clinton because they “oppose” Trump.

According to the RealClearPolitics polling average, the race is just too close to call. Clinton only leads by one percent, well within the margin of error. Clinton’s lead has shrunk significantly since her major post-convention poll bounce and has all but evaporated with recent attacks on Trump supporters calling them a “basket of deplorable” and her health scare stumbling and collapsing at the 9/11 memorial, her pneumonia diagnosis and continued secrecy surrounding her health problems.

This year’s campaign has been very partisan, and the news media and their polls showing bias for and against their favored and least candidate. This bias is affecting recent polls and can account for the see-saw of the national poll numbers. The bias might also mean the race is far closer than both sides would like to admit, and the polls in battleground states more significant than any national polling number.

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