New poll shows Republican voters still support Trump after lewd tape

By Bonnie K. Goodman

HENDERSON, NV - OCTOBER 05: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump gestures during a campaign rally at the Henderson Pavilion on October 5, 2016 in Henderson, Nevada. Trump is campaigning ahead of the second presidential debate coming up on October 9 with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
HENDERSON, NV – OCTOBER 05: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump gestures during a campaign rally at the Henderson Pavilion on October 5, 2016 in Henderson, Nevada. Trump is campaigning ahead of the second presidential debate coming up on October 9 with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Republican voters are ready to forgive and move forward win their nominee Donald Trump even after an audio and video from 2005 showing him making lewd comments about women. A new Politico/Morning Consult poll released on Sunday morning, Oct. 9, 2016, found that Trump still has support from 74 percent of Republican voters and less than 15 percent believe he should drop out of the race. The poll suggests that voters’ opinions about Trump’s tape and remarks about women counter Republicans leaders be it in Congress or governors that quickly withdrew support for the nominee after the Washington Post released their report on the recordings.

According to the poll, the opinion as to whether Trump should drop out is based on partisan lines. In total, 39 percent believe he should drop out of the race, 45 percent believe he should remain in the race. The numbers for Trump to drop out seem larger because 70 percent of Democrats want him out, as opposed to only 12 percent of Republicans, while only 13 percent of Republican women feel that way. Republicans are disagreeing about how their party leaders are handling the situation where there was a mass exit of support on Saturday, Oct. 8, with 74 percent believing the party should continue supporting Trump as the nominee, with only 12 percent disagreeing.

Even Republicans are sticking by Trump they still do not condone what he did, with a majority of all voters having a negative opinion of the recording. Of the voters who saw the accompanying video 74 percent had a “negative reaction,” with on a scale of 10, 4 7 percent saying they felt a very negative, zero rating to the video. Again, how the reactions have a partisan divide, with 69 percent of Democrats feeling very negatively, with only 22 percent feeling that negatively about the video. On the opposite spectrum, 10 percent of Republicans felt positive about the video, which is more troubling than Republican choosing to stand by their nominee.

The poll also looked the national race, and the numbers only showed a percent drop for Trump even after the scandal. Clinton still leads a four-way race with 42 percent to Trump’s 38 percent, while Libertarian Gary Johnson has eight percent and the Green’s Jill Stein with three percent, nine percent of voters are still undecided. Clinton still maintains her lead in a two-way race with the GOP nominee with 45 percent support to Trump’s 41 percent.

Another poll conducted by ABC News in partnership with SSRS survey research firm released on Sunday looked exclusively at whether Trump should drop out the race, and the response was far more negative than the Politico/Morning Consult poll. According to the survey, 43 percent said he should drop out, but 57 percent believe he should remain.

The study also looked at whether the video affected whether voters would vote for Trump or not. The opinion was mostly split with 53 percent saying they were “less likely” to vote for Trump now with 46 percent saying it will not affect their voting. The numbers were split along gender lines with 62 percent women less likely to support Trump, with 55 percent of men were indifferent. The one aspect the poll did not examine is whether these views were along partisan lines.

Bonnie K. Goodman has a BA and MLIS from McGill University and has done graduate work in religion at Concordia University. Ms Goodman is an expert in presidential campaigns and election history and she has been covering American elections as a journalist since 2004.

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